George Price Boyce in Shropshire

First of all, followers, I must apologise for my silence. Since my last post on this blog I have plunged into the PhD life, and have found it difficult to set aside enough time to write a decent post. Still, I thought I would make a brief contribution here on a little subject that’s caught my interest.

George Price Boyce photographed in the early 1860s by Cundall, Downes & Co. National Portrait Gallery.
George Price Boyce photographed in the early 1860s by Cundall, Downes & Co. National Portrait Gallery.

George Price Boyce (1826–97) is familiar to most people as a kind of peripheral figure in the Pre-Raphaelite movement, which in some ways is true. He wasn’t a member of the PRB, but first made the acquaintance of Dante Gabriel Rossetti early, in around 1849. Their friendship was close and long-lasting; Boyce, more financially comfortable than other Pre-Raphaelites, purchased a substantial number of Rossetti’s drawings and watercolours over the years (over 40 pictures in all). Having trained initially as an architect, ‘[Boyce] did not depend on his art for a livelihood, but his work is of fully professional standard.’ (J. A. Gere, Pre-Raphaelite Drawings in the British Museum, 1994, p.78.) He earned his money from pawnbroking, having two shops in London by the 1850s. His sister, Joanna Mary Boyce (also known as Joanna Mary Wells) was also a talented artist. Examples of G. P. Boyce’s excellent watercolours depicting landscapes and vernacular architecture in crisp, minute detail can be seen below.

George Price Boyce, Landscape at Wotton, Surrey: Autumn, 1864–5. Watercolour on paper. Tate.
George Price Boyce, Landscape at Wotton, Surrey: Autumn, 1864–5. Watercolour on paper. Tate.
George Price Boyce, Mr Buckingham's House, Dorchester, Oxfordshire, 1869. Watercolour on paper. British Museum.
George Price Boyce, Mr Buckingham’s House, Dorchester, Oxfordshire, September 1869. Watercolour on paper. British Museum.

Having just today got hold of a copy of Boyce’s diaries (edited by Virginia Surtees, 1980), my attention was caught by mentions of the artist’s visits to Shropshire. I’m always interested in anything artistic related to that county; particularly south Shropshire and Ludlow, where I was born and raised. Boyce’s reasons for going to Shropshire are familial, as his aunt, Elizabeth Thomas, lived with her husband at Ashford Bowdler, a small village outside Ludlow. Although he may have visited her before the 1870s, he did not produce any Shropshire watercolours until that decade. The first mention is on 8 April 1872, when Boyce took 3 drawings of Ludlow scenes to the Old Water Colour Society Gallery to be exhibited: ‘Old Shropshire Farmhouse (bought by Armstead, £40); The Bull Inn Yard, Ludlow, 40 gns.; Street Corner at Ludlow, £35’ (Diaries, p.54). On 20 April his Bull Inn Yard, Ludlow watercolour sold ‘before I left the room’ (p.55).

George Price Boyce, The Teme at Ludlow, 1872–3. Watercolour on paper. British Museum.
George Price Boyce, The Teme at Ludlow, 1872–3. Watercolour on paper. British Museum.

In 1872–3 Boyce exhibited 9 more sketches at the Old Water Colour Society Gallery, among them views of the River Teme from Ludlow and a view ‘From a Window, Ludlow’ (Diaries, pp.55–6). The above picture of the Teme near Ludlow was shown at this time. A. E. Housman praised the river several times in A Shropshire Lad (1896):

In valleys of springs and rivers, By Ony and Teme and Clun, The country for easy livers, The quietest under the sun.

George Price Boyce, On the Banks of the Teme, Ludlow, October 1872. Watercolour on paper. Sold Christie's, 22 February 2011 (lot. 276).
George Price Boyce, On the Banks of the Teme, Ludlow, October 1872. Watercolour on paper. Sold Christie’s, 22 February 2011 (lot. 276).

This watercolour of the same view of the Teme from a different spot on the bank was painted in October 1872. Boyce has added human interest in the small figures beside the water and, of course, the little dog watching them in the bottom right corner.

George Price Boyce, The Teme from Ludford, 1871. Watercolour on paper. Private collection.
George Price Boyce, The Teme from Ludford Bridge, Ludlow, 1871. Watercolour on paper. Private collection.
George Price Boyce, possibly Ludlow Church and Ancient House, 1872–3. Watercolour on paper.
George Price Boyce, St Laurence’s Church from the Garden of the Reader’s House, Ludlow, 1872–3. Watercolour on paper.

This watercolour is my favourite, as it shows a building in Ludlow that I often enjoy walking past and looking at. The Reader’s House in Church Walk is a picturesque building dating from the 16th and 17th centuries. There are many timber frame houses in Ludlow, but this stands out because of its proximity to St Laurence’s Church – dramatically present in Boyce’s picture – and because of the charming juxtaposition of grey stone and black-and-white timbers on its front exterior (below). Oddly, the two great red-brick chimneys are not visible in the watercolour – perhaps they were a later addition, or perhaps Boyce felt they would disrupt the composition and so left them out.

The Readers House, Ludlow
The Readers House, Ludlow (front view)
Doorway of the Reader's House, Ludlow
Doorway of the Reader’s House, Ludlow (photo from my Instagram)

The front doorway of the Reader’s House bears some lovely antique carvings I particularly admire!

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